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3DTV Roundup
They’re here…or should we say, almost here. As promised at CES 2010, the new 3DTVs are starting to appear at your local Best Buy store and there are more coming over the next few months. With higher price tags and 3D programming in short supply, it remains to be seen whether or not now is the right time to buy a 3DTV. However, keep in mind that a 240Hz LCD TV with HDMI 1.4 and enough processing power to handle 3D decoding can even make your 2D picture look better so until the next wave of TVs with quantum dot displays and Ultra High Definition (UHDTV) resolution come along, 3DTVs should carry you through the next few years.
Panasonic 3D Plasmas Are On Sale at Best Buy
Plasma TVs have always been especially good at displaying high refresh rates, now with 120 or 240Hz refresh rates necessary for 3D, plasma TVs which had been losing ground to the lighter weight, more energy efficient LCD TVs are now in demand. We’re sure Panasonic is jumping for joy with the interest in 3DTV and resurgence of their plasma TVs.
The initial 3DTV offering from Panasonic is available exclusively at Best Buy and consists of a Blu-ray 3D player, the DMP-BDT300 ($399.99), and their 50-inch TC-P50VT20 3D-enabled 1080p plasma HDTV ($2499.99). You get one pair of active shutter 3D glasses with the TV and you can buy additional glasses for $149.99. Later this spring, Panasonic will offer a VT25 series of 50 to 65-inch 3DTVs that will be available from other resellers. The TC-P50V20 was recently tested by HDGuru.com that called it an “excellent HDTV,” and gave it 4 out of 5 hearts.

The 3DTV package includes Panasonic's VIERACast platform, available on its 3D Blu-ray players that offers streaming services like Netflix, Amazon, Pandora and YouTube, along with BD-Live support and a WiFi adapter. The new, soon to be available, DMP-BDT350 Blu-ray player will add DLNA for easy home media sharing and is expected to cost $449.99.

Samsung 3DTVs Have the Right Features
Samsung’s first of many 3DTVs have started to appear at retailers like Sears and Amazon. The Samsung UN46C7000 46-inch 1080p 3D LED backlit LCD, with 240Hz refresh, Internet connectivity with Samsung Apps and “AllShare” DLNA home networking is available for $2599.99. A larger, 55-inch version, the UN55C7000 is available for pre-order at $3299.

We’ve read that Samsung is offering a limited time deal on a 3D “bundle” that includes a $399.99 3D Blu-ray player or an $899.99 3D Blu-ray home theater system with two free pairs of glasses and a 3D version of Monsters vs. Aliens.
Sony 3DTVs Won't Be Here Until This Summer
Sony 3DTVs won’t be available until June (initially in Japan) but if you happen to live close to a Sony Style store you might be able to get a sneak peek of the LX900, HX900, or HX800 series 3DTVs. We’ve read that the 52-inch, HX903 version which includes two pairs of glasses will sell for the equivalent of $3,875 when it goes on sale in Japan on June 10th.

We’ve also read that the first Sony 3DTVs will require you to buy an external infrared emitter to run the active shutter glasses for around $50 with extra glasses costing around $130 a pair.
LG 3DTVs Looked Good at CES 2010
LG has not yet released any pricing and availability yet for their 3DTVs but we hear the LX9900 will have LED backlighting, TruMotion 400Hz refresh, and LG Netcast which offers Internet connectivity including access to YouTube and Picasa and will support DLNA for home media sharing. We read that we can expect to see 47-inch and 55-inch LG 3DTVs in mid-May.

LG’s new 3D Blu-ray player, the BX580 offers features including HDMI 1.4, WiFi connectivity, and DLNA.
Third Party Glasses That Work With All Sets?
XpanD has been providing Panasonic with their active shutter glasses and recently announced that they were going to be offering their glasses for sale for around $150 a pair. XpanD claims their glasses will work with most manufacturers using active shutter glasses. We’ll believe it when we see it although we are aware of efforts to “standardize” glasses and we suspect the signals to turn the “shutters” on and off shouldn’t be all that hard to interpret.
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XpanD has been providing

XpanD has been providing Panasonic http://www.onlypass4sure.com with their active shutter glasses and recently announced that they were going to be offering their glasses for sale for around $150 a pair. XpanD claims their pass4sure 220-801 glasses will work with most manufacturers using active shutter glasses. We’ll believe it when we see it although we are aware of efforts to “standardize” glasses and we suspect the signals to turn the “shutters” on and off shouldn’t be all that hard to interpret.

almost here. As promised at

almost here. As promised at http://www.onlypass4sure.com CES 2010, the new 3DTVs are starting to appear at your local Best Buy store and there are more coming over the next few months. With higher price tags and pass4sure 640-816 3D programming in short supply, it remains to be seen whether or not now is the right time to buy a 3DTV. However, keep in mind that a 240Hz LCD TV with HDMI 1.4 and enough processing power to handle 3D decoding can even make your 2D picture look better so until the next wave of TVs with quantum dot displays and Ultra High Definition (UHDTV) resolution come along, 3DTVs should carry you through the next few years.

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3D Television

Probably the way to go is with the new type of glasses, someone else mentions the old blue and red ones, they are probably not the way to go and I will tell you why from my own experience.
If you go to a movie and watch it with the red and blue or if you wish the red and green glasses you will only be watching the 3D effect for a short time possibly upto 2 hours. If you have a 3D Television and use it with the red and blue/green glasses and watch it for hundreds of hours it starts to affect you in a mysterious way, the eye with the blue fillter, say the right eye, effects the left hemisphere of the brain and that hemisphere sees blue and the same applies to the left eye with the red filter, the right hemisphere of the brain sees red and you would find after watching 3D in this way for many, many, hours, that when you take the glasses off and for a long time after, if you look at a glossy magazine or anything else with any of the primary colours of red, blue or green in it, those colours will still jump out at you as though 3D.
I may sound like an authority on the subject...........................thats because I feel am.

sapvbmdhdh

Just not worth it

I waited for 3D technology to advance to the point of being in the living room my entire life. When my family went to see "Captain EO" at Epcot Center when I was a kid, I watched the making of on HBO over and over for months before going on vacation. I was fascinated by 3D. When we finally saw the movie, being a kid I must not have known that the red/blue thing sucked, because I loved it. In high school I studied 3D on my own time and made 3D pictures on my computer. I used to buy two disposable cameras and tape them together and snap the pictures at the same time. Then when they were developed I'd cross my eyes to see the 3D effect. A few years ago when James Cameron said that he felt 3D was the future of movies, I got extremely excited. I read everything I could about the new Reel3D technology and I couldn't wait to see a movie using it. I wasn't able to actually get to a theater until last month when I saw Avatar, and I walked out of there crushed. The 3D that I had waited 30 years for, just doesn't work. The bottom line is, depth perception is only half of what makes us see in 3D, the other is depth of focus. Even with one eye shut, if you look around the room at different objects, your eye shifts focus and things in the foreground or background get blurry depending on what you're looking at. Even without depth perception, because your brain knows where your one eye is focused, it knows more or less how close or far away an object is. This is the half of 3D that they will NEVER be able to recreate simply by filming with two cameras. The director of photography has to pick what the camera focuses on. If things in the foreground are blurry, to focus attention on the middle ground, then if you chose to look at the foreground your eyes can't make the image come into focus. The result is your brain gets confused and believes it must be looking at a 2D plane, but your eyes are trying to send a 3D signal to the brain. The other option is to make the foreground, middle ground, and background all in focus. But this confuses your brain too because if you chose to look at the middle ground, the foreground and background are still in focus and your eyes naturally try making them go out of focus. Still, the result is your brain is confused by the conflicting information.

This limitation cannot be overcome. In gaming it would be possible if you had lasers looking at your eyes to determine what to make in and out of focus on the screen, but that would be so cost prohibitive it will never happen. The current crop of 3D movies is unfortunately no better than what we saw in the 80's. 3D simply distracts from the movie in a bad way.

There's no way I'm forking out thousands of dollars to get 3D in my home. I believe this fad will die out.

3D images in higher resolution

I have to say, I agree with you to a certain extent however a couple of things you might want to know. First, I read that James Cameron deliberately made the 3D in Avatar more of an immersive style which means a more subtle 3D affect. Second, if you don't want to pay more for a 3DTV you may want to consider that the features necessary to make a good 3DTV will also make for a great 2D HDTV. Also just as a side note, I happened to see a demo of a 340 ppi 3D display that is in use by surgeons performing remote operations and needless to say it was extremely realistic looking. The 3D on that display sounds more like what you were hoping for on the current generation of 3DTVs. I guess you'll just have to wait a little longer ;)

What, no Toshiba Cell TV? It

What, no Toshiba Cell TV? It will have 3D capability and a slew of REALLY compelling additional features for both 2D and 3D applications, like built in DVR and Blu-ray Disc playback, IPTV functionality, etc, etc. More importantly, it had one of the best pictures on the CES floor last January.

cofanhsl

A Sony PR told me that their

A Sony PR told me that their 3D TV in demo at sony style has a refresh rate of 200hz, could someone else confirm this ?

refresh rate

I believe that would be for a European TV that uses multiples of 50Hz rather than the US multiples of 60Hz

An expensive, risky deal

First adopters, beware!

As with all video technology, there are AGAIN two platforms. Who will win? I was wrong last time with Blu-Ray, and that could've been a VERY expensive mistake.

Also, two pair of glasses? What are the tiny tots, Uncle Ben and Grammy going to do on TV night? Oh - that's right - you can BUY additional glasses - at $150 a pop!

So until one 3-D platform is established, AND they get rid of those damned glasses, it'll be a while before I plunk down two months' mortgage payment to watch someone smack a paddle ball at me!

Aretha Franklin said it best - You better think what you're trying to do to me!

$150 3d glasses? Why not $5 polarized glasses?

There is a viable alternative to expensive shutter glasses. If the left and right images are polarized oppositely, the glasses needed are simply pieces of glass or plastic. I would favor circular polarization (left handed and right handed), so it can be viewed with your head in any position.

Think of light as pennies flying through the air. Some are vertical, and some horizontal. Our filters have slots in them for the pennies, either vertical slots or horizontal slots. When the pennies hit, only half get through. The others hit the slots crosswise and bounce off.

Many better quality sunglasses are linearly polarized. Most naturally occurring light is randomly linearly polarized. A vertically polarized filter eliminates about half of the light. So will a horizontally polarized filter, but it's the light the other lens lets through.

To see this in action, get two pair of polarized sunglasses. Wear one pair and put the other pair in front so you're looking through both lenses. Now rotate the second pair from normal (horizontal) to vertical. The view goes from slightly darkened to black.

So using vertical and horizontal polarization for 3D will work, but only when your head is perfectly vertical.

Fortunately, there's an easy way around this. Circular polarization. Instead of coming at us vertical or horizontal, this light is spinning to the left, or to the right.

If we take a lens with left hand polarization and another of right hand polarization, it doesn't matter how we turn them. No lights gets through.

If this is confusing, here's an in depth article with tons of math. You don't really need the math. Just look at the pictures.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_polarization

Here's a 3D system using circular polarization.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RealD_Cinema

There are several methods that I know of for implementing circular polarized 3D. There are probably more that I'm not aware of. One is to use two monitors with CP filters, and combine their images using mirrors. Another is to use two CP projectors and a silver screen (normal screens use reflective material that disrupt polarization). A third method would be a single projector with a spinning polarization filter. Many projectors already use spinning color wheels. Or we could use a really large wheel for our big screen. <--- JOKE - no flames please.

The iZ3D H220z1 is a 3D CP monitor. It uses 2 stacked monitor screens, the front sans backing. The review I read (as a gaming monitor) was generally quite favorable. I went to IZ3D's site. They've discontinued it, and didn't give any reasons. There are still some in stores, as low as $279.

Even though discontinued, this proves the concept of a display for circular polarized glasses. They're cheap. IZ3D sells theirs for $12-$15.

-Mike

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I doubt that you'll see any

I doubt that you'll see any TV's with 3D and no glasses, for this technology to work you have to have separate images for each eye to see and Samsungs linticular screen has a very small sweet spot thats not suited for home viewing.

more on 3-D glasses for 3-D HDTVs

These last few remarks are correct in that you will always need the glasses. This technology is not new and goes back to the 90s where I've used both systems to draw maps from 3-D aerial photographs.
NOTE: the Sony system above requires heavier more expensive "shutter" type glasses (runs on battery) that recieve an infrared signal from an emitter connected to the TV or BLU-RAY player. The Samsung system uses a pair of glasses similar to a normal pair of sunglasses where one lens is polarized and the other is not. These provide slightly less clarity but are significantly cheaper and do not require batteries.
This will turn out to be another "which system will win the market" and be the standard contest.

What about the Vizio TVs

I don't see anything about the Vizio 3D tvs. I have always thought they were one of the best TVs out there.

Vizio is not a manufacturer.

Vizio is not a manufacturer. They are an assembler (which means that they don't manufacture their own stuff, but buy parts and put them together). So their technology is usually a year or so behind companies that acutally manufacture their own product (LG, Panasonic, Samsung and Sharp). You most likely won't see any 3D from Vizio this year, because the manufactures wont sell their best technology right away.

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Vizio TV

If Vizio can assemble TV and other equipment with American workers with better salaries than the manufacturing workers, and still sell at lower prices than Sony or Samsung, then everyone who buys an original brand (Panasonic, Sony, Samsung, etc) are getting ripped off by local distributors! For this reason I will continue to buy Vizio and support more workers, even if they make a lesser profit.

Too bad that all of our TV manufacturing is offshore!

progress?

you will have to buy NEW copies of Star Wars. So vhs-beta. 8 track-cassette. records-cd broadcast tv-hd. 3d-? more money spent. quality better. okay. but jeez.

and now for our next electronic trick...